Category Archives: Sludge metal

Thou – 4th Of July

This is from the Kowloon Walled City / Thou Split 7″

 

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Review: Ferocious Fucking Teeth – Ferocious Fucking Teeth

From CtIndie:
There are some go to bands when looking for something tranquil to fall asleep to. New London’s Ferocious Fucking Teeth is not one of them. Though they are tagged with terms like sludge and stoner metal, they operate without the hazy layers of reverb or infinite drone that the genre is associated with. Nothing is masked with counterfeit noise, leaving only amplified copper and the human voice to carry their trudging weight. Distortion is the primary discernible effect, and that’s just from shear loudness.  On Ferocious Fucking Teeth’s 2011 EP, Hounds, they concentrated mostly on the immediacy of bluesy doom. With their first self titled full length, FFT decelerate the raw ferocity of classic hardcore and meditate on the often ignored details, while maintaining the fierce charm of their earlier material.
Down tuned baritone guitar replaces the standard issue bass, giving the low end a grim twang reminiscent of dusty western films. Dueling drum kits create towering serpents of hissing brass and rabid snare pops. And like any outfit with two drummers, there’s an omnipresent backbone of tribal rhythm. “One Bright Light” sets this tone with a battle cry of Pequot’s charging into war. The brawl between cowboys and indians continues on the groove laden “Hinkly”, which seamlessly rolls between blankets of riffs and ritualistic chanting. “Daytona” touches on the pretty before swiftly shredding apart into a mighty dirge of weeping solos.
Ferocious Fucking Teeth seem to pride themselves on playing with structure while vying to abolish the listener’s trust with any whiff of predictability. Vocals serve to puncture, and are delivered with the ardor of a megaphone wielding warlord. They range from snarled gang unity on “Don’t Go,” to whistling on “Putting the O Back in Country.” Instrumental preludes don’t graze on longer than necessary, or become redundant. You’ll also notice a lot of foundations being built, and then tested with battering obscurity. Highlights include “Pony” and build-to-destroy “River,” a swarm of antsy percussion that recalls the currents of the Thames.“Fred” is an exemplary case of dense punk that keeps melody in its back pocket, with rock-bottom heaviness at the helm.On tracks like “Mule” and “Fuck on a Weeknight,” FFT start to take on a swampy southern sludge sound, which makes sense as New London is kind of like the Dirty South of New England. Though FFT mostly chop down whale poachers in the style of Harvey Milk, “Fuck On A Weeknight” has that Kylesa jungle crawl that I anticipated. Standout track, “Haunted” employs driving rock that breaks apart into a strangely catchy crescendo.
This is an album for those who prefer their metal unfiltered and weird. Bring it with you on your next spirit quest to the desert.

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First Review of Baroness ‘Yellow and Green’

The luckiest man alive works at MetalSucks.net, as he has heard ‘Yellow and Green’ of Baroness, in its entirety. Here are excerpts on certain songs, for what has garnered a perfect review.

“Take My Bones Away” bashes its way through verses to a burly chorus, while “March to the Sea” backs a sullen melody with a sturdy backbone. The forward momentum is reminiscent of heavier ‘90s alt-rock bands like Hum and Quicksand, while the angular riffs and leads recall old-school emo and post-hardcore.

“Sea Lungs” moves back and forth between a Morse code riff and expansive, contemplative arpeggios before leading into a suitably Baroness solo. “Cocainium” starts out sounding like something off of one of your uncle’s Yes triple records with pot stems in the spine, then morphs into a snarling rock riff before ebbing back out.

After wordless opening “Green Theme” — which sets heavenly, ethereal chords over an unnerving, dissonant ambiance before kicking in — and radio-single-candidate “Board Up the House,” the album shifts moods. The band become more sparse, the production drier in spots, and the atmosphere decidedly more melancholy.

By the time the album picks back up for “Psalms Alive”, “Stretchmarker”, and last proper song “The Line Between,” you’re ready to be brought back up.

According to old French legends, by mixing yellow and green, a new color called ‘chartreuse’ is made. According to even older French legends, by playing Yellow and Green simultaneously, you can hear The Chartreuse Album. It might not match up perfectly but man does it sound magical.

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YES

The planet’s  greatest simian defense league has protected us once again. Listen to Rats, off the groups latest record, NO. Their weapon of choice on the aforementioned tune calls himself Nate Newton.

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The Visuals of Torche’s ‘Harmonicraft’

Torche made a record of musical songs called Harmonicraft, and a Mr. Santos came up with the cover art to complement it. Together, Torche and Santos have created a unique explanation for the dynamics of our universe. In the realm of Harmonicraft, winged gummy-goat monsters drift through the cosmos. Each are the guardians of specifically oriented worlds, conveyed in ink reminiscent of a late 1980s cartoon. Civilizations resembling downtown Atlanta, mountain ranges and amusement parks are all represented on the backs of these blue dragons.  The fates of the beings who live there are controlled by the candy filled rainbows of the harmonsters, while evil purple demigods counter with cloud flumes of boring vegetables. Torche provides the sonic commentary on the duality between simple sugary pleasures born from overflowing rainbows, and the dark clouds that overshadow them.

I like to imagine Walk it Off as the sound to a person falling from one of these harmonsters and pummeling through the sky blue atmosphere, towards a reality they’ve never known.

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Jason…The Dragon

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Listen to Engineer and eat Chicken Enchiladas

Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 1/2 cup chopped green onions
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1 (4 ounce) can diced green chiles
  • 1 (10.75 ounce) can condensed cream of mushroom soup
  • 1/2 cup sour cream
  • 1 1/2 cups cubed cooked chicken breast meat
  • 1 cup shredded Cheddar cheese, divided
  • 6 (12 inch) flour tortillas
  • 1/4 cup milk

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Lightly grease a large baking dish.
  2. In a medium saucepan over medium heat, melt the butter and saute the green onion until tender (about 3 to 4 minutes). Add the garlic powder, then stir in the green chiles, cream of mushroom soup and sour cream. Mix well. Reserve 3/4 of this sauce and set aside. To the remaining 1/4 of the sauce in the saucepan, add the chicken and 1/2 cup of shredded Cheddar cheese. Stir together.
  3. Fill each flour tortilla with the chicken mixture and roll up. Place seam side down in the prepared baking dish.
  4. In a small bowl combine the reserved 3/4 of the sauce with the milk. Spoon this mixture over the rolled tortillas and top with the remaining 1/2 cup of shredded Cheddar cheese. Bake in the preheated oven for 30 to 35 minutes, or until cheese is bubbly.

 

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Night Goat

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Bird Eater ‘Utah’ Review

Bird Eater conceives the sort of music that brings two worlds together, at a blindingly red prairie horizon. These are the worlds of hardcore and ye’ old American west. Imagine Earth’s Hex: Or Printing in the Internal Method bunched up with Converge. It’s like the sediment in Clint Eastwood’s thermal coffee mug ground down with flakes of freight rail rust. The idea could pass for a gimmick, but on Utah, Bird Eater does not merely dance with this strange genre mash up, they embrace them in the upstairs rooms of brothel saloons until the caws of crows break the temporary solitude of morning.

Interludes like Carrion, Blood Grove and opener United Steel Apocalypse (USA) are clean passages of atmospheric guitar twang haunted by grunting dark horses and the chugging of trains. These trains are distant at first, but as they loom closer, the listener only anticipates being barreled over by a thousand tons of iron. The vocal manner is violent and relentless, delivered in gang unity over crushing breakdowns, re: Bovine Flesh Dance. The Crying Witch (La Llorana) relays the story of an ancient Mexican curse with building paranoia and frantic time signatures that give way to a foggy southern rock singed riff.

The stylistic inspiration of Bird Eater is varied. The most obvious being math dictated sludge, but hardcore punk and groove metal also brawl their way into the mix. Questions for a Ghost Maker grinds the hardest of cores, as it tells the tale of a weapon with a ‘pearl handed pistol grip and gun metal blue barrel’. The storytelling on Utah is surprisingly provocative, painting portraits that unite classic American western noir with present day elements. It Takes Days to Boil the Bones shifts between all these influences with swift capability, catching it’s acrid breath following the phrase: I’ll make you some ghosts/ I’ll make you so many ghosts/ I took the lung and broke two ribs/ It felt like roots under a shovel/ I left the rest white man buffalo style. Chase that with a shoot-em-up electrical guitar solo, and you have yourself a deal, sir.

This isn’t cowboy metal – it’s the soundtrack to the ugly lack of humanity in the most barren of places. A full length from Bird Eater is in the works and expected to be released sometime in 2012.

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